Interview with Culture Sonar

When you make a first record as accomplished as Violet Delancey’s 2016 debut When The Clock Strikes Midnight, you might not feel a need to deviate. But Delancey was feeling restless heading into the making of her sophomore release Columbia Road.  It led her down another musical path. “I really knew that I wanted to go in another direction,” Delancey told CultureSonar in a recent interview. “With the first record, the producer and I had talked about the Hot Band sound [the collective that backed Emmylou Harris on many of her classic albums]. And I felt like it relied really heavily on that reference, which was great for that record. But I think I felt a little inhibited by trying to match that style. I was imagining something that was going to be a little bit less restrictive for the next record. I wanted to master songwriting and the country/roots style really helped me learn a lot about that. But that doesn’t match what I feel creatively in general.”

 

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Violet Delancey
First Listen of "Columbia Road" on The Bitter Southerner

The pairing of Delancey with veteran producer Andy LeMaster, a co-founder of the longstanding Chase Park Transduction studio in Athens, Georgia, has resulted in a record that seems doubtful to get airplay on straight country radio, but dang sure should capture the attention of anyone who values sonic exploration. With LeMaster at the helm, Delancey has created a record on which the country is clear in her voice, but the lyrics conjure fairy tales in a sonic context that sounds more Kate Bush than Florida-Georgia Line. It even, at its best moments, recalls Emmylou Harris' groundbreaking "Wrecking Ball" album.

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Violet Delancey
Interview & "Eloise" Premier with The Young Folks

Violet Delancey first appeared on the scene in 2016 as a country/folk artist with her well-received debut, When the Clock Strikes Midnight. Her latest album, Columbia Road, available May 25, is a huge stylistic departure that sees Delancey rebranding herself as an “Americana-tinged dream pop singer-songwriter.” Produced by Andy LeMaster (R.E.M., Bright Eyes, Azure Ray) in Athens, Ga., Columbia Road has Delancey drawing inspiration from Kate Bush and Emmylou Harris. Those influences are apparent, especially in Delancey’s new single, “Eloise,” which feels in a lot of ways like it’s straight out of a ‘80s Kate Bush fever dream. Delancey’s vocals fit nicely in with this genre change; the lyrics meander along backed by soft percussion and guitar, lulling the listener into the hazy, ethereal world her and LeMaster have created. It’s clear that Delancey is on a musical journey, and she brings the listener along nicely.

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Violet Delancey
Wide Open Country premiers "Eurydice"

In Violet Delancey‘s new song “Eurydice,” the Americana singer channels Greek mythology to deliver a compelling tale of heartbreak. Driven by a classic train beat, a little chicken pickin’ and Delancey’s frail but fervent vocal, “Eurydice” contrast’s the story of the nymph with the reality of earthly heartbreak.

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Violet Delancey
Earbuddy premiers "Echo in the Moon"

Nashville-based musician Violet Delancey‘s debut album was an homage of sorts to country music with the Los Angeles native taking in the spirit of her new surroundings. However, her sophomore effort Columbia Road finds her taking a bigger creative leap. “I wanted to push the boundaries a little more,” she says about the change. This meant working with producer Andy LeMaster, who previously worked with indie artists like Bright Eyes, Azure Ray and of Montreal. Columbia Road pulles inspiration from Delancey’s college years studying mythology. This combined with the new dreamy surroundings gives the songs a mystical personality that’s sure to mesmerize you. Today, we premiere the album single, “Echo In The Moon”, which features Delancey’s warbling vocals atop sparkling guitars, chiming keys and syncopated percussion. Check it out below.

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Violet Delancey